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Jem D’jelal: Throwing the Scrum Certificate away?

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Reblogged with permission from Jem D'jelal, the original author of
 this content, as a contributor to blogagility.com. Originally published 
on LinkedIn January 20, 2016.

Jem D'jelal Jem D’jelal Coaching individuals & teams to find “better” ways of working.

 

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Apple’s New Internet of Things Device helps you Find My -anything-

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A man can dream. I wish this were a reality now. I can’t count how many IoT devices the market has been recently flooded with. It seems crowd funding is encouraging a lot of technology to be driven to the market faster than ever. Which is a good thing. The problem is so far that none are proven…yet. Read the rest of this entry »

My Experiments with the Story cubes

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Going to have to figure out how to virtualize this concept.

Culture Reinvented!

cubes

Hello World,

I have been working with the agile teams for a long time. Agile has gifted a lot of meetings viz. planning, grooming, retrospective, etc. Retrospectives are one of the most powerful and often the most ignored meetings as they end up as boring and ineffective. Hence, a lot of engagement and innovation is required to reinvent the retrospectives. I came across Rory’s story cubes and thought to ‘experiment’ the same in my retros.

I purchased a few boxes of cubes and mixed the same to have diverse stories: 9 cubes in a box as per the recommendation.

Instance 1:
When I introduced the cubes to my first team say Team X: they migrated to the exploring mode — started seeing the different faces of the cubes. Then, they rolled the same. The first time it was too much silence.Then, we played the second iteration. To my surprise: amazing stories…

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Why “Agile” and especially Scrum are terrible

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How the foolish try to lay the blame for their own failures on a hammer… Not to mention the misuse of the adjective Agile.

Michael O. Church

Note: My first novel, Farisa’s Crossing, will be released in early 2020.

Agility is a good thing, no doubt, and the Agile Manifesto isn’t unreasonable. Compared to a straw-man practice called “Waterfall”, Agile is notably superior. Yet, so much of Agile as-practiced is deeply harmful, and I don’t really think that the Agile/Waterfall dichotomy is useful in the first place.

There’s a variety of Agile, called Scrum, that I’ve seen actually kill a company. By “kill”, I don’t mean “the culture wasn’t as good afterward”. Rather, I mean that its stock dropped by almost 90 percent in less than two years.

What is Agile?

Agile grew up in web consulting, where it had a certain amount of value: when dealing with finicky clients who don’t know what they want, one typically has to choose between one of two options. The first is to manage the client: get expectations set…

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How to Kanban with Trello

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Agile, Data, APIs, startups and more

You hear about Kanban all the time. There are great guides out there but you do not know where to start. Is this the case? I had the same problem too. So I tried to gather some really baby steps of implementing a simple Kanban system for your early development phase.

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Effective use of Lean-Agile frameworks and systems (Scrum, Kanban) for Global Remote Teams

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oblivion-movie-melissa-leoRemote teams and Lean-Agile frameworks

In this article I cover various strategies and methods for effectively implementing and using Agile, Scrum, Lean and Kanban (the system) for globally remote teams (virtual workforces, telecommuters). I will also attempt to debunk the myth that Scrum may not be used for remote teams. We are not going to deep dive into the “Agile” mindset, values, and principles (Agile Manifesto) or Lean thinking here. Although, they are the critical foundations for using / implementing Scrum effectively.

Over the years I have heard many people say that you can’t “do” Scrum with remote teams or some other such nonsense. I find this fascinating because I have done Scrum with remote teams for years — successfully.

Read the rest of this entry »

Management’s Three Eras: A Brief History

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We have to move away from Taylorist thinking.

Organization as machine – this imagery from our industrial past continues to cast a long shadow over the way we think about management today. It isn’t the only deeply-held and rarely examined notion that affects how organizations are run. Managers still assume that stability is the normal state of affairs and change is the unusual state (a point I particularly challenge in The End of Competitive Advantage). Organizations still emphasize exploitation of existing advantages, driving a short-term orientation that many bemoan. (Short-term thinking has been charged with no less than a chronic decline in innovation capability by Clayton Christensen who termed it “the Capitalist’s Dilemma.”) Corporations continue to focus too narrowly on shareholders, with terrible consequences – even at great companies like IBM.

More at HBR: https://hbr.org/2014/07/managements-three-eras-a-brief-history