Software

10-minute I/O – Test Reliability – YouTube

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Observations on the testing culture of Test Driven Development

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The impact of software teams using TDD must not be understated. It is critical. Attention to the core technical skills of modern software development are critical elements of the continuous delivery pipeline (DevOps). I’ve been reading uncle Bob’s stuff and Kent Beck’s stuff again. It has been a great refresher from the old days (late 90’s, early 00’s) when I didn’t know jack and discovered XP. Back then I didn’t know enough to realize what I was missing. Less excuses today!


This is not a primer on Test Driven Development. It contains my personal observations of re-starting the discipline and the problem of unit…

Source: Observations on the testing culture of Test Driven Development

Planning Defects into the system

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Why on earth do we do that?

Team A, an Agile Release Train (ART), or the mythical Scrum team, has a lot of technical debt. In an effort to reduce the technical debt, management decides to create a bunch of new “container” “FEATURES” in the product backlog to address batches of defects. Because they want to understand the value of the (fixing) defects.

Except there is a problem. Defects are not new features. Well, in a sane software world we hope not? Defects are typically created while coding or configuring a new feature, right? Is it a defect yet? Not really. Fix it NOW, not later. If it makes it to production? What is the cause of defects making it to production? Poor coding, standards, quality and automation, et cetera? No DevOps? or do defects occur magically in existing features (real ones)? (not my code!!) We all know how computers have minds of their own…

I’ve seen that oddly familiar pattern of desire to package up defect fix/technical debt effort into a feature or story or a suite before. I call these “projects”, “probably to be implemented with waterfall.” That type needs project managers and factory workers, not Lean-Agile practitioners, creative knowledge workers driven by autonomy, mastery, and purpose.

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Stretched Target on a Sprint? Please Stop!

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Authored by Preetam De, a blogagility.com contributing author.

In the last few days several people have asked me a question about stretched targets on Scrum sprints – not sure if it was a co-incidence or an ongoing vibe. So I will take a moment to explain it.

This article will not revisit the negative consequences in detail of having a stretch target. I will assume the obvious with a quick recap, so I can focus on the solution in detail rather than discussing the problem.

Quick Recap – Why do we think we need it?

  1. When we feel the need to manage a person rather than the work they do.
  2. When we focus on Efficiency over Effectiveness.
  3. When we focus more on tools and practices more than the principles behind them.
  4. To impress stakeholders they need everything “right now”
  5. To impress authority by over-estimating our capabilities
  6. When we assume – “What happened last sprint won’t happen again”
  7. When we don’t trust a team member and say “We need to keep them busy”

How can we avoid Stretch Targets?

A) By focusing on the flow of work that matches the business need Read the rest of this entry »

I&A Series – “As a member of the leadership team we need to see the portfolio roadmap with early warning signals / input for potential technical or schedule issues”

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I started a new series of posts where I will answer some actual problems/ideas presented in an I&A problem solving workshop as part of open space facilitation. This is the second of a few dozen that I plan on covering. If you have any comments, please, let’s learn together.

 

Problem/Idea #2:

 

“As a member of the leadership team we need to see the portfolio roadmap with early warning signals / input for potential technical or schedule issues”

 

A SAFe Answer

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Tushar Paunikar: You Always Have A Choice!!!

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Reblogged with permission from Tushar Paunikar, the original author of
 this content, as a contributor to blogagility.com. Originally published 
on LinkedIn August 3, 2017.

 

You always have a choice! If you think about it, you always have a choice. No matter how hard it is to accept, but you always have a choice.

The alarm goes off at 5 AM! You have a choice.

Not feeling too upbeat to go to work? You have a choice.

Bored with the daily mundane tasks you are required to perform at work? You have a choice.

Disillusioned with the state of affairs of the current government? You had a choice. Rather you will again have a choice.

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Tushar Paunikar: Agile and the KRA Conundrum

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Reblogged with permission from , the original author of
 this content, as a contributor to blogagility.com. Originally published 
on LinkedIn, November 22, 2016.

 

Life can be pulled by goals just as surely as it can be pushed by drives. -Viktor E. Frankl

Metrics drive behavior. I bet all would agree. We have experienced this umpteen times in our professional life. Even our personal life is abundant with examples where metrics influence people’s behavior.

If my kid has the target to score an ‘A’ in Math and that target is linked to a new bike, he will try to find insincere ways to achieve his target, if he sees his attempts to study sincerely may not be fruitful.

If a developer has the target to maintain 80% code coverage and that target is linked to a quarterly Most Valuable Player award, (s)he will try to find nasty ways to increase code coverage, if (s)he sees that all attempts to write meaningful unit tests may not meet the project deadline.

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